FAQs




  • What is a Board-Certified Veterinary Surgeon?
  • Why choose a Board-Certified Surgeon?
  • What do I need to prepare for my initial consultation at VSC?
  • What is included in a consultation?
  • Other than my pet, what do I need to bring with me to the appointment?
  • How long will my consult take?
  • Does VSC accept all pet insurance?
  • Can my pet have surgery the same day as the consultation?
  • When will my pet have x rays done?
  • How will my primary care veterinarian find out my pet’s test results?
What is a Board-Certified Veterinary Surgeon?

Following veterinary school, a veterinarian pursuing a specialty in surgery will undergo further training to become a specialist. They must complete an internship, a three-year residency, publish research in a scientific journal and pass a rigorous examination in order to become Board-Certified. Surgery specialists are called a “Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons” or referred to as a “Board-Certified Surgeon”.

With advancements in veterinary surgery, the American College of Veterinary Surgeons separated small and large animal residencies. Small animal surgery residents focus their training and skills exclusively on surgical diseases of small animals while large animal residents train on horses and farm animals. Small animal surgeons are distinguished by additional acronyms, SA, following their diplomacy status. At Veterinary Surgery Center of Sarasota, our surgeon Dr. Scott Rose is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons, Small Animal.

Why choose a Board-Certified Surgeon?

In addition to a Board-Certified Surgeon’s specialized training, surgeons have access to state-of-the-art facilities, advanced equipment and offer a higher level of expertise in surgical diseases, helping to ensure the best possible outcome for your pet. Similar to human surgical centers, veterinary surgeons typically employ veterinary technicians with additional training in areas such as anesthesia monitoring and pre and post-operative surgical care. By seeing the most challenging and complex cases on a day to day basis, surgeons can provide pet owners with many options (some of which may not be available from your primary veterinarian) and help you determine the best treatment for your pet.

What do I need to prepare for my initial consultation at VSC?

By completing and submitting your client registration (****LINK TO CLIENT REGO****) online prior to your visit, you can save time when you arrive at VSC. This also allows us to get your pet’s past medical records and radiographs from your veterinarian before your visit. If your primary veterinarian uses digital radiographs, those x-rays can be sent directly to us by email. If they are film radiographs, you can bring them to the appointment or they can be mailed. The morning of your pet’s consultation you should withhold food for pet in case additional tests are needed (it is okay to have water available). To ensure safety when arriving to VSC Sarasota, canine patients should be on a leash, and feline patients should be in a crate.

What is included in a consultation?

Consultation with our veterinary surgeon involves a detailed review of your pet’s recent and past medical history, a physical examination, orthopedic examination, gait analysis and full discussion about the diagnostic and/or therapeutic options for the condition your pet has presented for.

Other than my pet, what do I need to bring with me to the appointment?

If you were provided paper records or film radiographs from your primary veterinarian, you should bring those with you to the appointment. If you have pet insurance, bring your claim form as well.

How long will my consult take?

Please allow 30 minutes to one hour for the consultation and 15 minutes for registration. If radiographs or other tests are needed your pet may need to stay with us. In some cases, you may be able to wait for the test.

Does VSC accept all pet insurance?

We accept all pet insurance plans at VSC. If you plan to claim a visit on your pet insurance, please bring the documents that need the veterinarians signature to your consultation or email them to us with “Insurance Forms for “Patient First Name, Last Name” in the subject line. We include a full medical report to support the claim, so please allow 3-5 business days to process the request.

Can my pet have surgery the same day as the consultation?

In some cases, we will perform surgery the same day as the consultation; most often it is for a surgical emergency. In the majority of the cases we will perform all necessary pre-operative diagnostic tests the day of the consultation, provide you a written estimate of the procedure and schedule surgery for the following day or the next available day. This time is beneficial as it allows you to get items necessary for the recovery or make arrangements for the recovery process.

When will my pet have x rays done?

If x-rays are necessary to diagnose a condition they can be done the same day as the consultation. Many of our radiographs are of limbs and joints that must be positioned in a specific way. If your pet is painful, nervous, or aggressive to strangers we will need to use a quick acting sedative for the radiographs. This is for the pet’s safety and the staff’s safety as it can reduce the radiation exposure.

How will my primary care veterinarian find out my pet’s test results?

Your primary veterinarian is a critical part of the recovery process as they are often a very quick resource and they are familiar with your pet. We will update your primary veterinarian after the consultation and the procedure. We also supply a referral letter that explains what procedures were performed and the follow-up that is necessary for your pet.

  • Do I need to bring anything to VSC the morning of surgery?
  • At what time do I withhold food and water before surgery day?
  • Can I bring a personal item for my pet for the day of surgery?
  • Should I bring my pets medications with them for surgery?
Do I need to bring anything to VSC the morning of surgery?
  • If you have medications associated with the current condition/injury such as pain meds or anti-inflammatories, please bring the remainder of those medications. If you plan on not bringing these specific meds or need refills, please provide a list with what you currently give your pet, the concentration/size of the tablet, and the number of pills remaining (if any).
  • If your pet has any critical medications such as insulin, please bring those to be given to your pet during their stay with us.
  • It is best to let your pet relieve themselves before they are admitted for the surgery.
At what time do I withhold food and water before surgery day?

In most cases food is withheld at 10 pm, however, if your pet eats kibble at dinner time, food should be withheld at 7pm since dry food takes longer to digest. You pet’s water bowl can be picked up the morning of surgery.

Can I bring a personal item for my pet for the day of surgery?

Yes, you can bring a single item with you for your pet during recovery. Please keep in mind that there is always a possibility that the item is soiled or becomes misplaced when patients move to a new bed before and after surgery. Make sure that you have a picture of the item, and that it is labelled with your pet’s name and surname with a permanent marker for identification.

Should I bring my pets medications with them for surgery?

Since a variety of medications will be prescribed and or filled after surgery, it is important to know what your pet is taking. We want to ensure that there are no interactions. If you have medications and do not want a new prescription, please let us know in advance.

  • If you have medications associated with the current condition/injury such as pain meds or anti-inflammatories, please bring the remainder of those medications. If you plan on not bringing these specific meds or need refills, please provide a list with what you currently give your pet, the concentration/size of the tablet, and the number of pills remaining (if any).
  • If your pet has any critical medications such as insulin, please bring those to be given to your pet during their stay with us.
  • What can I expect when I drop my pet off for surgery?
  • At what time of the day will my pet have surgery?
  • My pet’s procedure is scheduled for the afternoon, so why do I need to bring my pet early in the morning?
  • How long will my pet’s procedure last?
  • How is my pet monitored during surgery?
  • Will my pets pain be adequately managed?
  • What is multimodal pain therapy?
  • Are additional x-rays done during surgery?
What can I expect when I drop my pet off for surgery?

Upon arrival to VSC the morning of your pet’s surgery, we will confirm all necessary forms are completed and signed. Then your pet will be admitted for their procedure. Your pet will be prepped for their procedure. After surgery, and once your pet is recovered from anesthesia, a member of our staff will call to give you a quick update. Then Dr. Rose will call to update you with a more detailed account of the surgery and the findings. If you have not heard from us, and would feel more comfortable checking in, please feel free to give us a call anytime. We will give you the most up-to-date information on the status of your pet.

At what time of the day will my pet have surgery?

The surgery schedule is determined the morning of surgery, and it is dependent upon many factors such as the complexity of each procedure, the patient’s estimated recovery time, special equipment required, etc.  Changes in the surgery schedule may happen from time to time.

My pet’s procedure is scheduled for the afternoon, so why do I need to bring my pet early in the morning?

Similar to a human surgery facility, there is a great deal of preparation required before each procedure to ensure a smooth and safe surgery schedule. Allowing enough time for our patients to adjust to the hospital environment can often times help reduce their anxiety.

How long will my pet’s procedure last?

Each procedure requires preparation time, set-up of the operating room and instruments, procedure time, and recovery. We are able to provide rough estimates for most cases, however, there a multitude of reasons why a procedure or anesthesia duration may be longer than initially provided. Specifics about your pet and their surgery will be discussed with you before any procedure is performed.

How is my pet monitored during surgery?

Every anesthetized patient at VSC is monitored with a barrage of equipment. ECG, blood pressure, exhaled carbon dioxide, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, body temperature, pain/unconsciousness are all standard measurements at VSC. Every patient has a dedicated nurse stationed with them to adjust the anesthesia accordingly.

Will my pets pain be adequately managed?

At VSC, we strongly believe in multi-modal pain control. We will address your pet’s surgery pain before they even experience any. We routinely use local anesthetics, regional anesthetics (such as epidurals), anti-inflammatory medications, and injectable opiate medications, as well as cryotherapy following surgery.

What is multimodal pain therapy?

Much research has been done on the causes and sources of pain. There are a variety of medications that treat pain through different methods of action. Treatment of pain through different receptors and pathways is called multimodal analgesia (pain control).

Are additional x-rays done during surgery?

Most of the necessary x-rays are taken prior to anesthesia to reduce the time that they are under general anesthesia. Following surgery, we will take additional radiographs to confirm accurate placement of any metal implants from the surgery.

  • How soon after surgery do I need to bring my pet back to VSC?
  • Are any follow up appointments included with my pet’s surgery?
  • After my pet’s sutures are removed, are there any other follow up appointments?
  • When are additional X-rays/diagnostic tests needed for my pet?
How soon after surgery do I need to bring my pet back to VSC?

When your pet is discharged from the hospital you will receive printed instructions about the recovery process and any necessary follow up appointments. Typically, an appointment for the removal of any skin sutures is the first appointment at 10-14 days after the procedure. The cost of this appointment is covered by the surgery fee.

Are any follow up appointments included with my pet’s surgery?

Yes, the initial appointment after surgery to remove a bandage or to remove sutures is covered by the surgery fee. Follow up appointments after that are not included in the original surgery cost unless otherwise stated in the initial consent forms.

After my pet’s sutures are removed, are there any other follow up appointments?

Each procedure requires a different follow up schedule. VSC will give you detailed recovery instructions so you will know what to expect for your pet following surgery. For example, an orthopedic procedure would typically require you to see the nurse for the four week follow up, and then the doctor for the final eight week follow up when x-rays are taken. For a soft tissue surgery, your pet may only need to come back for suture removal.

When are additional X-rays/diagnostic tests needed for my pet?

In many surgeries radiographs (x-rays) or other diagnostic tests (e.g. blood work) may be needed to evaluate the healing of progress of the recovery or the disease. Your discharge instructions will outline these diagnostics tests and when they are recommended. We make every attempt to schedule these tests when they are convenient for your schedule.

  • How is my pet monitored after surgery during their recovery?
  • Will my pets pain be adequately managed?
  • What is multimodal pain therapy?
  • How soon can I expect to hear an update about my pet’s surgery?
  • How long will my pet need to stay after surgery?
  • Is food and water given after surgery?
  • What do I need to bring when I come to pick up my pet after surgery?
  • How long after surgery can my pet go back to normal activity?
How is my pet monitored after surgery during their recovery?

Patients are kept on monitoring equipment until they are fully recovered from anesthesia. In addition, VSC was designed around keeping patients visible to our staff at all times. Larger patients are kept on comfortable bedding in front of the nurse stations until they are fully recovered from anesthesia. Smaller patients recover from anesthesia in a quiet ICU that is protected from all the noises of the treatment area.

Will my pets pain be adequately managed?

At VSC we make multimodal analgesia (pain control) our priority. We use a variety of medications to prevent or reduce pain from developing prior to surgery as well as injectable and oral medications after the procedure. It is important to note that since your pet is more comfortable they may try to be more active; it is still critical that they follow the activity restrictions after surgery.

What is multimodal pain therapy?

Much research has been done on the causes and sources of pain. There are a variety of medications that treat pain through different methods of action. Treatment of pain through different receptors and pathways is called multimodal analgesia (pain control).

How soon can I expect to hear an update about my pet’s surgery?

You will be contacted after your pet has had their endotracheal (breathing tube) removed (extubated), and they are breathing on their own. This may be up to an hour after the procedure. The risks of anesthesia can extend through this time, so we pay extra attention to your pet until they are breathing on their own. Your nurse may call you with an initial update; the surgeon will call shortly after with more details about the surgery.

How long will my pet need to stay after surgery?

In most cases, we recommend that a patient remain in our care until the following morning. General anesthesia can often cause nausea or other effects for several hours after surgery. This may cause abnormal behaviors, inappetance, nausea, vomiting, etc. We use a variety of injectable medications in these cases to control pain and treat the symptoms.

Is food and water given after surgery?

Your pet will be offered food and water a few hours after surgery once they are fully recovered.

What do I need to bring when I come to pick up my pet after surgery?

If you are picking up your canine pet, please bring your leash; if you are picking up your feline pet please bring a transport crate. If you are supplying your own e-collar, please bring it with you for the car ride home.

How long after surgery can my pet go back to normal activity?

Recovery time varies for each procedure and pet. Specific instructions will be given to you for your pet’s recovery that will include the phases of when to reintroduce activity. A general rule of thumb after most orthopedic procedures is 8 to 12 weeks before returning to full activity, and for soft tissue surgery, you pet should take it easy for two weeks’ post-surgery.

  • What forms of payment do you accept?
  • When is payment due?
  • Is full payment required at time of service?
  • Is there a payment plan available?
  • Does VSC accept pet insurance?
  • Will I be given an estimate for my pet’s surgery or procedure?
  • If another party is paying for my pet’s surgery, how is this handled?
What forms of payment do you accept?

VSC except all major credit cards (MasterCard, Visa, AMEX, Discover), personal checks (must be verified at the time of payment), Care Credit, PayPal (under certain conditions), and cash.

When is payment due?

Payment is due when services are rendered.

Is full payment required at time of service?

For diagnostics or procedures under $500, full payment is required at the time of service. For diagnostics or surgery over $500, we require a deposit of 50% of the high end of the written estimate at the time of drop off for procedures. The remaining balance is due before your pet is discharged.

Is there a payment plan available?

VSC only uses third-party financing services for payment plans. Care credit is a separate medical credit card that can be applied for online or at VSC during your appointment.

Does VSC accept pet insurance?

We except pet insurance at VSC. Most pet insurance companies will reimburse their clients per the terms of the insurance plan. This often means that the pet owner is responsible for full payment at the time of service.  If you intend to use pet insurance, please notify us at the beginning of your appointment to ensure your application and patient records can be prepared in a timely fashion. The cost of procedures is not affected by insurance coverage.

Will I be given an estimate for my pet’s surgery or procedure?

If your pet requires a procedure or a therapy that exceeds $500, we will be provide you with a written estimate. Because every patient is treated with an individualized treatment plan, there can be a range for the cost of the procedure. The estimate we provide you this range to the best of our ability in predicting these costs.

If another party is paying for my pet’s surgery, how is this handled?

We understand that there are times when the pet owner cannot be present for the appointment and sends their pet with a friend or family member. VSC offers 3rd party payment for these situations. There are some additional forms that are necessary in these situations and will require the paying party to have access to internet and a phone. Please notify a staff member of this situation, so we can help you get this taken care of before discharge.




info@vscsarasota.com
941.893.1500
8033 Cooper Creek Boulevard,
        #101, University Park,
        Florida 34201

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